Monday, February 18, 2013

Out of Africa

Only few films leaves impression at heart and Out of Africa is one of the kinds. The beautiful yet romantic drama is staged through the African landscapes, works on the script loosely adopted from the autobiographical book Out of Africa written by Isak Dinesen, which published in year 1937. Meryl Steep plays the brave women of pseudonym (Karen Blixen) flawlessly expressing the love and disappointment elegantly, flapped wings like an angel throughout the film.

The story drives back in 1913 at Denmark’s cold winter hunting ground chugs into the vast wild Africa, Karen travels in plan of starting a dairy farm in British East Africa (now Kenya) with boyfriend Blixen, who she marries following a brief ceremony. But her anticipations went distressed when her money misused to purchase a coffee plantation rather a dairy farm; she lost faith with husband later learning his extramarital affairs and lead her contract with disease. She also develops a close friendship with a local big-game hunter(Robert Redford) which later turned into love affair, moved her close with him and they go for hunting and camping in forest together. But their differences on material affairs kept them away from marry and financially lose drive her back to Denmark writing her experience on Africa.

The film also touched by the concern of education and health of African tribe children and alike the prominence of words, the scenes weren’t enlightened. But the African chef and care taker of Karen’s house amazes through their English speaking and beholds the expression on eyes, rather indifferent action on face. The most impressive was the background score, whereas its romance or revealing the vast wild Africa, music plays an adjacent role upon the breathtaking scenes: the biplane ride above the African landscape and passage of steam locomotive seems uneasy to forget stunningly. Even I watched it through the home theater connected to LED TV, the impressions seem to never unchanged and I would count this film as one of the best I have watched.

Fact

The film released in 1985 (the year I was born) was directed and produced by Sydney Pollack under the Universal Pictures.  I too learned the film was one of the vastly awarded, including seven Academic Awards on main resources:  the sound and cinematography which fascinated me a lot on front.  The soundtrack by John Barry took the fifteenth place in the American Film Institute's list of top 25 American film scores.

10 comments:

Optimistic Existentialist said...

I can't believe I've never seen this movie!! I must watch this. Happy Monday Jeevan.

TexWisGirl said...

such beautiful cinematography in this film. :)

Destination Infinity said...

I might want to read the book. Thanks for the reco.

Destination Infinity

Jyoti Mishra said...

Oh I'm so going to watch it..
started downloading it :)

ladyfi said...

Haven't read the book, but the film is fabulous!

Devilish Angel said...

Good review...

eden said...

Nice review! I would like to watch it.

George said...

Thanks for reminding me of this wonderful film. I saw it when it was newly released, and should look at it again.

Rajesh said...

This sure looks a great film. I will watch this.

Srinivas said...

Seems like a lovely film - and thank you for capturing the main strand of the plot. :)The book cover (or is it the film wallpaper?) that you have given is also representative of the storyline and Africa - a continent I have always wanted to visit, and may well do sometime in the future.

Meryl Streep, by the way, is one of my favourite actresses :)